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Announcing the latest issue of the Int. Journal of Mobile HCI

Source: IGI Global, 9 July 2012

The contents of the latest issue of: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (IJMHCI) Official Publication of the Information Resources Management Association Volume 4, Issue 3, July - September 2012. Published: Quarterly in Print and Electronically ISSN: 1942-390x EISSN: 1942-3918

Published by: IGI Publishing, Hershey-New York, USA
Editor-in-Chief: Joanna Lumsden, Aston University, UK

Editorial preface

Joanna Lumsden, Aston University, UK
To read the guest editorial preface, please consult this issue of IJMHCI in your library or click the following link: http://www.igi-global.com/journal/international-journal-mobile-human-computer/1126

Paper one

Balancing Awareness and Interruption in Mobile Patrol using Context-Aware Notification

Jan Willem Streefkerk (Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), The Netherlands) D. Scott McCrickard (Virginia Tech, USA) Myra P. van Esch-Bussemak ers (Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), The Netherlands) Mark A. Neerincx (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands)

In mobile computing, a fundamental problem is maintaining awareness of the environment and of information presented as messages on a mobile device. In mobile police patrols, officers need to pay attention to their direct environment and stay informed of incidents elsewhere.

To prevent unwanted interruption, a context-aware notification system adapts the timing and appearance of incident messages, based on user activity (available, in transit, or busy) and message priority (high, normal, or low).

The authors evaluated the benefits and costs of adaptive notification compared to three uniform notification styles (presenting full messages, postponing messages or presenting indicators). Thirty-two trained student participants used a prototype notification system in a controlled mobile patrol task. The results were validated  in a follow-up study with twenty-four police officers.

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Paper two

Lessons Learned from Large-Scale User Studies: Using Android Market as a Source of Data

Denzil Ferreira (University of Oulu, Finland) Vassilis Kostakos (University of Oulu, Finland) Anind K. Dey (Carnegie Mellon University, USA)

User studies with mobile devices have typically been cumbersome, since researchers have had to recruit participants, hand out or configure devices, and offer incentives and rewards. The increasing popularity of application stores has allowed researchers to use such mechanisms to recruit participants and conduct large-scale studies in authentic settings with relatively little effort.

Most researchers who use application stores do not consider the side-effects or bi ases that such an approach may introduce. The authors summarize prior work that has reported experiences from using application stores as a recruiting, distribution and study mechanism, and also present a case study of a 4-week long study using the Android Market to deploy an application to over 4000 users that collected data on their mobile phone charging habits.

The authors synthesize their own experiences with prior reported findings to discuss the challenges, advantages, limitations and considerations of using application stores as a recruitment and distribution approach for conducting large-scale studies.

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Paper three

How Do Users Search the Mobile Web with a Clustering Interface?: A Longitudinal Study

Tomi Heimonen (University of Tampere, Finland)

Category-based search result organization holds promise as a means of facilitating mobile information access. This paper presents the results of a longitudinal user study that investigated how a mobile clustering interface is used to search the Web. The author describes the participants' search behavior and discusses the benefits and limitations of category-based result access.

Study results show that category-based interaction was considered situationally useful, for example when the participants had problems describing their information need or needed to retrieve a subset of results.

The paper proposes design guidelines for category-based mobile search interfaces. These include improved strategies for presenting the categories in the search interface, the need to improve the categorization methods to provide more representative category structures, and accounting for the contextual aspects of mobile information needs.

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For full copies of the above articles, check for this issue of the International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (IJMHCI) in your institution's library. This journal is also included in the IGI Global aggregated "InfoSci-Journals" database: http://www.igi-global.com/EResources/InfoSciJournals.aspx.

Call For papers

Mission of IJMHCI:

The primary objective of the International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (JMHCI) is to provide comprehensive coverage and understanding of the issues associated with the design, evaluation, and use of mobile technologies.

This journal focuses on human-computer interaction related to the innovat ion and research in the design, evaluation, and use of innovat ive hand held, mobile, and wearable technologies in order to broaden the overall body of knowledge regarding such issues. IJMHCI also considers issues associated with the social and / or organizational impacts of such technologies.

Coverage of IJMHCI:

Topics to be discussed in this journal include (but are limited to) the following:

  • case studies and / or reflections on experience (e.g. descriptions of successful mobile user interfaces, evaluation set-ups, etc.)
  • context-aware / context-sensitive mobile application design, evaluation, and use
  • design methods / approaches for mobile user interfaces
  • ethical implications of mobile evaluations
  • field-based evaluations and evaluation techniques
  • gestural interaction techniques for mobile technologies
  • graphical interaction techniques for mobile technologies
  • issues of heterogeneity of mobile device interfaces / interaction
  • lab v. field evaluations and evaluation techniques
  • lab-based evaluations and evaluation techniques
  • mobile advanced training application design, evaluation, and use
  • mobile assistive technologies design, evaluation, and use
  • mobile commerce application design, evaluation, and use
  • mobile HCI lab design / set-up, mobile healthcare application design, evaluation, and use
  • mobile interactive play design, evaluation, and use
  • mobile learning application design, evaluation, and use
  • mobile technology design, evaluation, and use by special (needs) groups (e.g. elderly, children, and disabled)
  • multimodal interaction on mobile technologies
  • non-speech audio-based interaction techniques for mobile technologies
  • other emerging interaction techniques for mobile technologies
  • other related issues that impact the design, evaluation, and use of mobile technologies
  • speech-based interaction techniques for mobile technologies
  • tactile interaction techniques for mobile technologies
  • technology acceptance as it relates to mobile technologies
  • user aspects of mobile privacy, security, and trust
  • user interface architectures for mobile technologies
  • user interface migration from desktop to mobile technologies
  • wearable technology / application and interaction design, evaluation, and use

Interested authors should consult the journal's manuscript submission guidelines at www.igi-global.com/ijmhci.

All inquiries and submissions should be sent to: Editor-in-Chief: Joanna Lumsden at ijmhci@igi-global.com